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Threat Finance counts on financial institutions, commercial suppliers and corruption to thrive, says expert Don Semesky

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 Though they may be unaware of it, the emerging field of threat finance impacts nearly every financial institution and hundreds of commercial enterprises, especially those with multinational operations. First coined by US military officials a few years after the terrorist attacks of September 11, threat finance describes the funds flowing into or out of a wide range of national security threats, from terrorism to drug trafficking to foreign corruption to human trafficking and others, as well as efforts to choke off this financing.

Don Semesky, one of the world’s noted achievers and thought leaders in financial crime control, who was a Special Agent of the Internal Revenue Service and later formed the Office of Financial Operations of the US Drug Enforcement Administration, provides fascinating insight into threat finance in this ACFCS Financial CrimeCast. Semesky assisted in the launch of the Afghan Threat Finance Center, which became a vital element in combating terrorist organizations there and in the region.

Semesky will be a featured speaker at the ACFCS Financial Crime Conference February 5-7 in New York and serve on the Threat Finance panel.

In this ACFCS podcast he explains how threat finance intersects with financial institutions and commercial companies.

Now the principal of Financial Operations Consultants, in Washington, DC, he guides listeners on how military and law enforcement agencies in the US and other countries target the funding of the criminal networks that are behind national security threats.

He also shows how corruption plays a key role in facilitating various major threats, terrorism and narcotics trafficking, and gives best practices that institutions and businesses can use to guard against being exploited by threat actors.

(Don Semesky will be one of five experts dissecting the financing of national security threats and how private sector institutions are involved, legitimately and illegitimately, on the Threat Finance panel at the ACFCS Financial Crime Conference & Exhibition, Feb. 5- 7, 2014 at the Marriott Marquis in New York. More than 40 other renowned experts will join him as speakers on the 13 practical, timely panels of the conference. To register or to download the conference brochure, go to www.financialcrimeconference.com)